painting of an African woman and child
Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection

On view now – October 13, 2019
Presented by The Joe Orgill Family Fund for Exhibitions
Organized by the Johnson Collection

Spanning the decades between the late 1890s and early 1960s, this exhibition examines the particularly complex challenges female artists confronted in a traditionally conservative region during a period in which women’s social, cultural, and political roles were being redefined and reinterpreted. Whether working from dedicated studio spaces, in spare rooms at home, or on the world stage, the artists showcased made remarkable contributions by fostering future generations of artists through instruction, incorporating new aesthetics into the fine arts, and challenging the status quo.

Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection features the works of forty-two women artists working in and inspired by the American South, including works by such diverse artists as Kate Freeman Clark, Loïs Mailou Jones, Ida Kohlmeyer, Adele Lemm, Augusta Savage, Alma Thomas, and Helen Turner. The exhibition encompasses a variety of media including painting, sculpture, and works on paper.

This comprehensive endeavor is drawn from the holdings of the Johnson Collection, located in Spartanburg, South Carolina.  The Johnson Collection was founded in 2002 as a private collection for public good with the goal of illuminating the rich history and diverse cultures of the American South. Spanning the eighteenth century to the present day, the collection seeks to emphasize the dynamic role of the art of the South within the larger context of American art.

Sponsored by: 

Kate and Michael Buttarazzi | Karen and Preston Dorsett | Andrea and Doug Edwards | Rose M. Johnston | Anne and Mike Keeney | Ellen and William Losch | Nancy and Steve Morrow | Irene Orgill | Gwen and Penn Owen | Irene and Fred Smith | Adele Wellford | Vance and Willis Willey | Barbara and Lewis Williamson

Adele Marion Gawin Lemm (1897-1977), Untitled, circa 1965. Oil on linen. The Johnson Collection 2004.08.10
Loïs Mailou Jones (1905-1998), Africa, 1935. Oil on canvas board. The Johnson Collection 2016.10.02


 

  oil painting on a woman, kate freeman clark
Kate Freeman Clark

On view now – October 13, 2019
Presented by The Joe Orgill Family Fund for Exhibitions
Organized by Dixon Gallery and Gardens

This exhibition brings together nearly forty paintings by Southern-born Impressionist Kate Freeman Clark (1875-1957). Working mostly in New York, Clark produced an impressive and varied body of work between the years of 1893 and 1923. In the fall of 1894, Clark, born and raised in Holly Springs, Mississippi, enrolled at the Art Students League of New York, where she studied painting under William Merritt Chase. Between 1896 and 1902, Clark spent consecutive summers at Chase’s Shinnecock Hills Summer School of Art, creating over three hundred paintings during her time there. Nearly all of the works Clark produced at Shinnecock were impressionistic landscapes created en plein air using unexpected materials like burlap to reinforce the rustic scenery she painted.

Kate Freeman Clark spent the first decade of the twentieth century submitting her paintings to prestigious juried exhibitions, using the name “Freeman Clark” to hide her identity as a woman artist. Despite these successful showings, Clark never sold any of her paintings, out of respect for her family’s disapproval of women’s involvement in business. Clark abandoned painting, along with her artistic career, when she returned to her native Mississippi in 1924. Her oeuvre, as well as her talent, was virtually unknown to her Mississippi community during her lifetime. It was not until her death in 1957 that her paintings were located in New York’s Lincoln Warehouse. Clark willed her entire body of work, approximately one thousand paintings and drawings, to her hometown, along with funding and plan to build a gallery dedicated to her life and work. Established in Holly Springs in 1963, the Kate Freeman Clark Art Gallery is the result of her bequest.

Kate Freeman Clark highlights the artist’s rich body of work, defined by her intimate portraits of family and friends, bucolic landscapes, and compelling still life paintings.

Sponsored by: 

Kate and Michael Buttarazzi | Karen and Preston Dorsett | Andrea and Doug Edwards | Rose M. Johnston | Anne and Mike Keeney | Ellen and William Losch | Nancy and Steve Morrow | Irene Orgill | Gwen and Penn Owen | Irene and Fred Smith | Adele Wellford | Vance and Willis Willey | Barbara and Lewis Williamson

Kate Freeman Clark, Bishop Barns, ca. 1896–1902. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Kate Freeman Clark Art Gallery.
Kate Freeman Clark, Self-Portrait in Blue Dress, ca. 1896–1902. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Kate Freeman Clark Art Gallery.


 

abstract oil painting with blues and reds  abstract oil painting with reds and yellows
Elizabeth Alley: Place Shapes 

On view now – October 6, 2019
Mallory/Wurtzburger Galleries

Native Memphian Elizabeth Alley has been carefully observing and recording the world around her for the entirety of her career.  Producing work ranging from intimate yet incisive sketches to beautifully rendered paintings in both watercolor and oil, she has been a leading force in the twenty-first-century Memphis arts community. 

Alley’s exhibition in the Mallory/Wurtzburger Galleries this summer will highlight her most recent work—brilliant, expressive oil paintings that capture the diverse and sometimes extreme landscapes she has experienced in her travels to Iceland, Newfoundland, and Portugal.  These paintings reveal her interest in discovering and capturing the way humans interact with nature around the world.  Equally studied and spontaneous, Alley’s paintings from each location coalesce to form a continuous narrative of her personal experience in the landscape and more universal panoramic view of some of the most remote yet majestic parts of the world.

Elizabeth Alley, View from the Grotto, 2019 and Douro Bridge, 2019; Oil on paper; Courtesy of the artist. 



Who Is that Artist?

July 9 – October 13, 2019
Liz and Tommy Farnsworth Education Building

In partnership with local artists Kristen Rambo, Corkey Sinks, Danielle Sumler, and Moth Moth Moth (a.k.a. JT Wilbanks), the Dixon presents its first Who Is That Artist? exhibition. Visitors will discover four interactive components, each featuring a window to the artist’s life, work or creative process. The playful and original displays, as well as the programming around the work, will encourage visitors of all ages to explore these inspiring artists' worlds.

Image: JT Wilbanks, Hyperactive Imagination (detail), 2019. Collage. Courtesy of the artist


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  • Tuesday, Sep 17 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

    Tours at Two

    Tuesday and Sundays, 2:00pm  Enjoy a guil...

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