Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman

January 19, 2020 – March 22, 2020 
Presented by The Joe Orgill Family Fund for Exhibitions
Organized by Cummer Museum of Art and Gardens

Augusta Savage: Renaissance Woman celebrates the work and legacy of one of twentieth-century America’s most influential artists. Augusta Savage (1892-1962) was a Black woman artist from the South whose career as a sculptor led her north to Harlem in 1921. Her talent, ingenuity, and determination led to her prominence and a successful career during the Harlem Renaissance. In addition to her own artistic practice, she worked tirelessly to challenge art galleries and museums to recognize Black artists. Savage’s work as an educator and activist in the Harlem community galvanized a younger generation of African American artists.

This landmark exhibition features more than fifty works of art, including sculptures, paintings, photographs, and drawings, by both Savage and the artists she taught, championed, and inspired. It is the first exhibition to consider Augusta Savage’s contributions to art and cultural history in light of the twenty-first-century concept of the artist-activist. August Savage: Renaissance Woman re-examines Savage’s place in the history of American sculpture and positions her as a leading figure who broke down the barriers she and her students encountered while seeking to participate fully in the international art world.  

This exhibition is curated by Jeffreen M. Hayes, Ph.D. and organized by the Cummer Museum of Art & Gardens with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Sotheby’s Prize.

Augusta Savage, Gwendolyn Knight, 1934–35; recast 2001; Bronze; Walter O. Evans Collection of African American Art & Augusta Savage, Gamin, ca. 1930; Plaster; Museum purchase, 2013.2

Sponsored by: Preston Dorsett | Nancy and Steve Morrow | Joe Orgill Fund for Exhibitions | Gwen and Penn Owen | Chris and Dan Richards | Trish and Carl Ring | Barbara and Lewis Williamson | Ann M. Mullis 


 

  
William Eggleston and Jennifer Steinkamp: At Home at the Dixon

January 26 – March 22, 2020
Presented by The Joe Orgill Family Fund for Exhibitions
Organized by the Eggleston Art Foundation with Dixon Gallery and Gardens

Over the fireplace in the Dixon Residence Living Room hangs A Memory by William Merritt Chase (1849-1916).  The painting, created around 1910, depicts a woman seated in a genteel domestic interior opening on to a sunlit Italian garden.  In subject matter and style, the painting speaks to a particular appreciation of “the beautiful” that has not lost its appeal more than a century later.

Inspired by Chase’s painting and the specific architecture of the Residence galleries, the Dixon has invited two pioneering American artists, William Eggleston and Jennifer Steinkamp, to present their work in unexpected conversation.

William Eggleston and Jennifer Steinkamp: At Home at the Dixon juxtaposes floral, garden, and still life imagery in late nineteenth and early twentieth-century painting with photographs by William Eggleston and computer animations by Jennifer Steinkamp that focus on similar themes.  Each artist’s chosen medium allows them to make new commentaries on these traditional subjects, making an intriguing connection between historic and contemporary art.


William Eggleston, Untitled, c. 1976; Dye transfer print; Courtesy the artist and Eggleston Art Foundation 

Jennifer Steinkamp, Diaspore 2, 2014; Computer animation; Variable dimensions; Courtesy the artist and Lehmann Maupin, New York, Hong Kong and geengrassi, London

Sponsored by: Preston Dorsett | Nancy and Steve Morrow | Joe Orgill Fund for Exhibitions | Gwen and Penn Owen | Chris and Dan Richards | Trish and Carl Ring | Barbara and Lewis Williamson | Ann M. Mullis 


 

     
Under Construction: Collage from The Mint Museum

January 19 – March 22, 2020
Presented by The Joe Orgill Family Fund for Exhibitions
Organized by The Mint Museum

Under Construction investigates the dynamic medium of collage. Although this artistic technique, in which materials are cut, torn, and layered to create new meanings and narratives, gained acclaim in the early twentieth century through the groundbreaking work of such artists as Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Kurt Schwitters, and Jean Arp, it experienced a renaissance (particularly in America) after World War II. African American artist Romare Bearden is widely credited with rejuvenating and reinvigorating the technique. His work serves as the point of departure for this fascinating exhibition.

Featuring more than thirty international artists, Under Construction explores the growth of the collage technique and aesthetic in the work of Bearden and his colleagues from the 1950s to the present. It includes numerous works by Bearden, as well as examples by such notable artists as Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Sam Gilliam, Howardena Pindell, Robert Rauschenberg, and James Rosenquist. The impact of the collage aesthetic in the fields of painting, printmaking, photography, and assemblage work is considered as well.

Presenting Sponsor    Organized by  

Sponsored by: Preston Dorsett | Nancy and Steve Morrow | Gwen and Penn Owen | Chris and Dan Richards | Trish and Carl Ring | Barbara and Lewis Williamson | Ann M. Mullis 

Romare Bearden. Evening of the Gray Cat, 1982; Collage on board; Collection of The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC, Gift of Bank of America. 2002.68.3. © 2019 Romare Bearden Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY, New York. and Sheila Gallagher. Ghost Orchid Plastic Nebula, 2018; Melted plastic on armature; Collection of The Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC, Museum purchase with funds provided by Wells Fargo. 2018.48


 

Lawrence Matthews: To Disappear Away: Places soon to be no more

January 12 – April 5, 2020
Mallory/Wurtzburger Galleries 

Open Late: Meet the Artist Opening Reception
Thursday, January 16, 6:00 – 8:00pm

Lawrence Matthews is a Memphis-born artist whose work includes painting, collage, ready-made sculpture, music, film, and photography. In addition to his own artistic practice, Matthews is a leading member of the Memphis artistic community. For the past two years he has served as program director for the CLTV, a dedicated art space in Orange Mound, curating exhibitions and working to create opportunities for other artists of color in Memphis.

To Disappear Away: Places soon to be no more highlights Matthews’ most recent work in color photography. These images are an exploration of the changing landscape in black neighborhoods around Memphis as a result of gentrification. Matthews’ lens captures both the people of these communities as well as the physical landscapes they inhabit. The resulting photographs represent the complexity of lived experiences—the hopeful openness of things to come and the haunting reminders of things past. They also illustrate the conflict between infrastructural decay and the beauty of being part of a community.

Lawrence Matthews, Lot III, 2019; Digital print from 35 mm film negative; Courtesy of the artist


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